What Does Dissociative Identity Disorder Feel Like?
Auto Beauty Business Culture Dieting DIY Events Fashion Finance Food Freelancing Gardening Health Hobbies Home Internet Jobs Law Local Media Men's Health Mobile Nutrition Parenting Pets Pregnancy Products Psychology Real Estate Relationships Science Seniors Sports Technology Travel Wellness Women's Health

What Does Dissociative Identity Disorder Feel Like?

Sometimes, individuals who have suffered repetitive abuse in childhood will protect themselves by “splitting off” into other identities. Dissociative identity disorder (DID) was formerly known as multiple personality disorder (MPD). A person with DID will separate him/herself from a situation that is uncomfortable or painful. It’s not anything one thinks about, the dissociation allows the person to disconnect, sort of like changing the channel on a TV.

Sometimes, individuals who have suffered repetitive abuse in childhood will protect themselves by “splitting off” into other identities. Dissociative identity disorder (DID) was formerly known as multiple personality disorder (MPD). A person with DID will separate him/herself from a situation that is uncomfortable or painful. It’s not anything one thinks about, the dissociation allows the person to disconnect, sort of like changing the channel on a TV.

We all dissociate to some degree. If you have ever driven home from work and don’t remember driving home, then you disconnected from the task of driving the car. Some part of your consciousness took over while you disconnected. When you get lost in a daydream or a movie you disconnect also. When I read a good book, I become part of the book as an observer. I disconnect from the here and now for a short time and let the words carry me a mental state where I experience the thoughts, and emotions of the characters. That is a form of dissociation that many of us do on a daily basis. Daydreaming and being carried away in a book are very mild forms of dissociations.

More intense forms of dissociation can change a person’s life in one way or another. A family member was diagnosed with DID about 15 years ago. I’ve never been formerly diagnosed, but I do dissociate in a profound way. For a long time, I felt that my mind was fractured. I compared the state of my mind to a shattered mirror; every piece of the mirror was a piece of me. I was ashamed of it. I wouldn’t talk about it, and I still don’t unless I feel lead to.

I wrote a poem that accurately describes how it feels to have a fractured personality. I’m not ashamed of it anymore. I have accepted these parts of myself to be parts of the creative person they have helped me to be. Prior to having these fractured parts, I don’t believe I really had any talents at all. I often wonder, “if I were fixed” would I be the same person I am now.

Below is the poem that is the window into what it sometimes feels like to be me:

Shattered Mirror

I see before me a mirror shattered.

Like me, every piece is fractured.

Yet through the pieces I found the strength

to go on and make the best of things,

and to cling to those that matter.

Images of me, broken, shattered.

Hold in the pain and locked it tight,

within my soul and heart of hearts;

Avoid the light and embrace the night.

Pieces of me, jagged scattered.

Dark shadows cast in moonlight

upon the broken glass;

yet hopeful eyes reflect the light.

Photo credit: Flickr.com

Consumer tip: Get discounts on leading health & medical advice brands by exploring the latest discount codes for health & medical advice. Utilize community-sourced coupons, promo codes, and in-store offers using our partner websites.
Need an answer?
Get insightful answers from community-recommended
experts
in Psychology on Knoji.
Would you recommend this author as an expert in Psychology?
You have 0 recommendations remaining to grant today.
Comments (3)

Great job! Charlene, Very difficult disorder to take care of. Feel really badly for these patients.

Ranked #17 in Psychology

Great discussion Charlene.

This is good to know and a very well penned poem too. Thanks.

ARTICLE DETAILS
RELATED ARTICLES
RELATED CATEGORIES
ARTICLE KEYWORDS